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The Manito Topos Project

The Manito Topos Project

Len Nils Beké is a doctoral student in in Hispanic Linguistics at the University of New Mexico. In the Manito Topos Project, Len has embarked on an initiative focused on the recovery of Nuevomexicano Spanish place names. This week, he also launches his fieldwork expedition, which he has called Seiscientas Millas Manitas (600 Manito Miles).

The Director’s Journal

The Director’s Journal

The Manitos Community Memory Project was recently launched with this ‘Digital Resolana’ serving as a way to generate an interest in the community toward developing a community archive. The blog also serves to document the process and progress of the overall project. In this thread, my own goal as the director of the project will be to use this space to journal short reflections about the project sharing my thoughts about the project, words, ideas, people and places. April 25th…

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The Moon Rises Over Hernandez Again and Again

The Moon Rises Over Hernandez Again and Again

One of the most famous and most sought after photographs in American fine-art photography is called “Moonrise, Hernandez, NM” shot by Ansel Adams in 1941. I first encountered this photograph as capital “A” art in my university art history course. I was taught to appreciate this photo from an objective perspective, to memorize all manners of facts about its medium and technique. It is silver gelatin print that stands the testament of time for many reasons, but particularly in terms…

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Crowdsourcing Togetherness

Crowdsourcing Togetherness

In the Facebook groups where manitas and manitos meet, digital communities centered around identification with the manitas and manitos homeland of Northern New Mexico and Southern Colorado, group members have become quite adept at using the power of online crowdsourcing to create meaningful accretions of collective knowledge and memory.

Ancestor Photos: Caring For and Sharing. Part 1

Ancestor Photos: Caring For and Sharing. Part 1

Whether tucked away in a shoe box, lovingly placed into a photo album or nestled comfortably into the same frames for a century or more, the photos that link to us to the stories of our heritage are fragile artifacts that require careful attention, even as we steward them into the digital age.

Los Argüellos – Connecting Migrations and Memories

Los Argüellos – Connecting Migrations and Memories

My interest about my family history began as a young child during our annual visits to my grandfather Jose Tiburcio Argüello and Antonia (Tonita) Cordova Argüello’s farm in Llano de San Juan Nepomuceno, now known as Llano, New Mexico. During our visits to my grand-parents farm my grandfather always reminded me of how our ancestors were the ones who settled all the villages in the surrounding area many years ago. In 1946 after my father Clarence Argüello completed his military…

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Welcome to the Manitos Digital Resolana

Welcome to the Manitos Digital Resolana

The Manitos Digital Resolana is a virtual gathering space for manitos, as people from rural northern New Mexico and southern Colorado call themselves. In many villages throughout this region, the resolana is the sunny side of a building, where people congregate to converse and share knowledge and wisdom. This Digital Resolana will serve as a space for people from these rural communities and their urban diasporas, where people connected to these villages now live, to reconnect, recollect, record, and reflect…

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Food Heritage: Diving Deep into Milk and Toast

Food Heritage: Diving Deep into Milk and Toast

Food writing and foodie culture, at its best, enthusiastically celebrates traditional food cultures, like ours here in Northern New Mexico. However, the quest for recipes often results in a concentration on a few iconic dishes that are repeated and often modified to suit popular tastes, as they travel far from their origins. While this aspect of foodie culture is an admirable thing in its own right, after all, who doesn’t like finding a delicious new variation on an old favorite? What can often be lost, is the thread of intimate heritage knowledge that ties us all to our culture.