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Mimi Roberts is a passionate advocate for cultural equity and is honored to serve as Project Manager for the Manitos Community Memory Project. Prior to her retirement from the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs in 2018, she administered a cultural technology internship program that prepared Media Arts majors from New Mexico Highlands University for professional careers in New Mexico's cultural and creative economy, helped develop a makerspace program for rural public and tribal libraries, and worked in support of initiatives to accelerate technology adoption throughout the Department. She freelances as an arts researcher, writer, and editor and in her other areas of expertise, including museum exhibition and program development, multi-institutional collaborations, and traveling exhibitions. She is immediate past president of the New Mexico Association of Museums.
Ay Mi Corazon – Lávate las Manos

Ay Mi Corazon – Lávate las Manos

Bien dice el dicho que una mano no se lava sola. It is true what is said, that one hand washes the other and now, more than ever that practice is imperative. This saying is also one that is evoked to recognize that we need each other, particularly in moments like this. As a part of the Manitos Community Memory Project, we asked Dr. David Garcia (Da Vid), one of our key partners, to help us create a hand washing…

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A Hidden Gem in Albuquerque

A Hidden Gem in Albuquerque

As New Mexico’s governor undertakes to improve our state’s educational system, understanding the winding road that has taken us to the present day becomes both more relevant and timely. Education history is an important topic we hope to incorporate into the Manitos Community Memory Project digital archive. Remembering can also provide cultural and historical context for these latest educational reform efforts. An important part of educational history for Manitos is the missionary efforts of Presbyterians, especially women, who raised money…

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Manit@ Migrations Stories

Manit@ Migrations Stories

Since we first launched this project, we have begun to hear remarkable stories of the migrations of manitos and manitas. We have also begun to gather data from families in order to more fully visualize these journeys, exploring when people left and where their travels took them. Over the course of this project, we will dedicate a blog entry to as many stories as we are able to gather. Please return to the site to read as we continue to…

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Rural Libraries as Sites for Community Memory

Rural Libraries as Sites for Community Memory

There’s something magical about entering rural libraries. They are warm and inviting community spaces crammed with books. Like their urban counterparts these small but mighty institutions are taking on new roles in the digital world. Computer terminals provide connection to all kinds of online information and are collecting points for community memory. The first computerized system to use the term “Community Memory” was invented in Berkeley in 1973. It was a simple electronic bulletin board that allowed users to send…

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Dancing Her-Story

Dancing Her-Story

In this post, we reveal how there are many ways to tell a story. In this instance, we share how a memory that is passed from generation to generation is taken up by the writer, who inspires the choreographer. Each telling building upon the last, developed to sustain the power of memory and history.

Welcome to the Manitos Digital Resolana

Welcome to the Manitos Digital Resolana

The Manitos Digital Resolana is a virtual gathering space for manitos, as people from rural northern New Mexico and southern Colorado call themselves. In many villages throughout this region, the resolana is the sunny side of a building, where people congregate to converse and share knowledge and wisdom. This Digital Resolana will serve as a space for people from these rural communities and their urban diasporas, where people connected to these villages now live, to reconnect, recollect, record, and reflect…

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